Baking Recipes, Brunch and Breakfast, Easter

Praline Pan Biscuits

These yummy flaky praline pan biscuits are cooked in a cast iron skillet. Invert them onto a plate for a sweet surprise!

These yummy flaky praline pan biscuits are cooked in a cast iron skillet. Invert them onto a plate for a sweet surprise!

These yummy flaky praline pan biscuits are cooked in a cast iron skillet. Invert them onto a plate for a sweet surprise!

I have flipped past this recipe at least a dozen times. I’m usually searching for instructions on something else – blueberry muffins, snickerdoodle cookies, a pie crust. Every time my eyes briefly focus on the bold red letters of the title before I flip the page and think, “I gotta remember to make that one day.”

I like a warm, fresh, baked good just pulled out of the oven for breakfast just as much as the next person. The problem is I’m usually tired, groggy, and it’s been at least eight hours since I’ve had anything to eat. I don’t want to pull out the mixing bowls and measuring cups, preheat the oven, wait for dough to rise, or follow directions. I just want to wake up to the smell of warm cinnamon and find a sweet little old grandma standing in my kitchen in an apron with a pan full of homemade sweet rolls in one hand and a mug of hot coffee in the other.

What’s that saying? The best part of waking up?

I sure do wish I had a wife.

These yummy flaky praline pan biscuits are cooked in a cast iron skillet. Invert them onto a plate for a sweet surprise!

The good news is, you can do much of your prep work for this recipe the night before. I rolled and cut my biscuits, laid them on a cookie sheet, and then sprayed the tops with cooking spray before covering them with plastic wrap and storing them in the fridge overnight. The next morning all I had to do was preheat the oven and assemble my biscuits. Breakfast was ready within 20 minutes.

The biscuits are flaky and the praline topping is sugary and sweet. It really was the best part of waking up.

These yummy flaky praline pan biscuits are cooked in a cast iron skillet. Invert them onto a plate for a sweet surprise!

 

praline pecan cathead biscuits on a white plate with brown sugar and pecans scattered around
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Praline Pecan Cathead Biscuits

These yummy flaky praline pecan cathead biscuits are cooked in a cast iron skillet. Invert them onto a plate for a sweet surprise!
Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Cook Time 12 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 8 people
Calories 212kcal
Author Lisa B.

Ingredients

Biscuits:

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup chilled unsalted butter
  • 3/4 cup milk

Praline topping:

  • 1/3 cup unsalted butter
  • 1/3 cup light brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup chopped pecans

Instructions

For the Biscuits:

  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  • In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.
  • Cut butter into mixture until it resembles coarse crumbs.
  • Add milk, and stir until dough comes together and begins to leave the side of the bowl, adding additional milk if necessary.
  • Turn dough out onto a floured surface. Lightly knead 10 times.
  • Roll or pat dough to 1/2-inch thickness. Cut into eight disks using a 2 to 2-1/4- inch round cutter.

For the Praline Topping:

  • In a small saucepan, melt butter and brown sugar over low heat, stirring constantly until sugar is melted.
  • Remove pan from heat and add the pecans
  • Pour mixture into a 10-inch cast iron skillet or a 9 x 1 ½ inch round cake pan.
  • Arrange biscuits in the pan.
  • Bake for 12-15 minutes or until biscuits are golden brown.
  • Turn pan out onto a large plate. Leave pan over plate for a few minutes to allow praline mixture to drizzle over biscuits. Serve warm.

Notes

Baked biscuits should be covered with aluminum foil or plastic wrap to prevent them from drying out. They can be left out on the counter for a couple of days. Any longer than that and they need to be stored in the refrigerator to prevent mold from forming.
To freeze unbaked biscuits, I suggest placing the biscuits in a round disposable cake pan rather than a cast iron skillet. Cover the top tightly with aluminum foil. Do not thaw to bake. Simply preheat the oven as the recipe instructs and move an oven rack to the top 1/3 of the oven. You will need to make the biscuits twice as long as the recipe recommends if baking from frozen.
To prevent the bottom of the pan from becoming to hot and burning the bottom of the biscuits before the tops are browned. Place them on a baking rack fitted inside a cookie sheet.

Nutrition

Serving: 1biscuits | Calories: 212kcal | Carbohydrates: 27g | Protein: 4.2g | Fat: 9.8g | Saturated Fat: 2.6g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2.5g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4.2g | Cholesterol: 1.8mg | Sodium: 348mg | Potassium: 73mg | Fiber: 0.9g | Sugar: 1.3g | Calcium: 110mg | Iron: 1.7mg

 

8 Comments

  1. Yum! Looks like great breakfast goodness!

  2. I totally agree with you. Sometimes I wish I had a wife! This does look duable though! Thank you for sharing! I noticed you mentioned that you could put them in the fridge over night. Does that effect the rising of the bisquits at all or the baking powder?

    • The Cooking Bride

      No, I didn’t think refrigerating them overnight affecting their ability to rise. However, I would probably recommend baking them within at least 8-10 hours after you make them.

  3. These look AMAZING. Your husband sure is a lucky guy – I want to wake up to these too!

  4. This looks like a perfect fall breakfast. Wow!

  5. Those look amazing-great breakfast treat for sure! And when I read the title of your post, I immediately sang “is folgers in your cup” to myself haha!!

  6. The recipe mentions baking soda but there is no amount, is it supposed to be 1/4t like your other biscuits?

    • The Cooking Bride

      Katelyn, thanks for pointing that out. There should be no baking soda in the recipe. I have made that correction.

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