Beef, Main Courses, St. Patrick's Day

Bourbon Glazed Corned Beef Brisket

Southern take on a St. Patrick’s day classic – glazed corned beef brisket is basted with bourbon, orange juice, whole grain mustard and brown sugar.

overhead shot of side view of sliced bourbon glazed corned beef and roasted vegetables on a white platter with a green napkin, tarnished silver meat fork, glass of beer and small dish of glaze to the side

Corned beef and cabbage … love it or hate it? As a kid, I was definitely on the hate side. A hunk of salty meat boiled for hours, usually served with a side of bland boiled potatoes and cabbage. Gross. As I ventured into adulthood and began learning how to cook, I discovered that even though boiling is the most conventional way to cook corned beef, it’s not the only way.

What is Corned Beef?

Corned beef is made from brisket, a cut of beef taken from the lower chest region of a cow. It has been salt cured, meaning it has been treated with a combination of salt, sugar, and nitrite for the purpose of preservation. In the days before commercial refrigeration, salt curing was a popular way to preserve perishable items. The word corned may refer to the large pieces of saltpeter use to preserve the meat.

While corned beef is typically associated with St. Patrick’s Day and the Irish, it’s not an Irish national dish. During the 17th century, Ireland was a major producer of corned beef. However, most of its citizens could not afford to eat it. Corned beef didn’t rise in popularity among the Irish until they began immigrating to the United States in the 19th century. What was considered a luxury item in their native country was suddenly cheap and readily available in their new home.

bourbon glazed corned beef ingredients include orange juice, brown sugar, water, mustard, bourbon, cornstarch and corned beef

Boil the Corned Beef

There are two reasons to boil corned beef brisket during preparation. First, brisket is a tough cut of meat. It requires a longer cooking time in order to tenderize the meat. Second, because corned beef is preserved in salt, obviously it’s going to salty. Boiling helps to remove some of the salt used during preservation.

Most store-bought corned beef has already been cured and is sold with a little packet of pickling spices that may include mustard seed, peppercorns, bay leaves, dill seed and juniper. Place the corned beef in an 8-quart stock pot and cover it with cold water. Add the content of the seasoning packet and bring the water to a boil.

boiled corned beef brisket in a stainless steel stockpot

Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover and boil the corned beef for three hours. Be sure to check the water levels periodically and add additional water to the pot if it starts getting to low. This step can be complete a couple days in advance. Just be sure to allow the corned beef to cool completely, then wrap it up in foil or plastic wrap to prevent it from drying out then store it in the refrigerator until you are ready to proceed to the next step.

Before you discard the water from the pot you boiled the corned beef in, reserve two tablespoons. We’re going to use it a little later to make the glaze.

Prepare the Bourbon Glaze

I’m of the opinion that everything tastes better with bourbon.  This bourbon glaze is sweet and really balances out the saltiness of the corned beef.

In a small saucepan, combine 1/2 cup of orange juice, 3/4 cup of packed brown sugar, two of corned beef juice, one teaspoon of whole grain mustard and 1/4 cup of bourbon. Whisk in one tablespoon of cornstarch until the sauce is smooth. Bring the glaze to a boil and cook about 1-2 minutes until the glaze has thickened.

hand whisking glaze ingredients together in a small saucepan

Apply the Glaze and Roast

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. I like to roast a few vegetables, such as thinly sliced wedges of cabbage, red potatoes and sliced carrots, in the bottom of the baking pan with the corned beef. Trust me, roasted cabbage is SO MUCH BETTER than boiled. I simply coat the veggies with olive oil, salt and pepper and arrange them in an even layer on the bottom of the baking pan.

sliced cabbage, carrots and potatoes coated in olive oil, salt and pepper in a baking dish

Brush the bourbon glaze liberally over the outside of the corned beef. Nestle the corned beef among the vegetables in the enter of the baking pan. Place the pan in the oven and roast for 10 minutes. Apply more glaze, then return it to the oven for an additional 10 minutes.  Repeat this one more time, for a total roasting time of 30 minutes.

pair of hands brushing the glaze over a corned beef brisket

The vegetables won’t quite be cooked through by this time, but we don’t want to overcook the brisket. Remove the brisket from the pan and set it on a cutting board to rest. Turn on your broiler, return the vegetables to the oven and continue to roast them until they start to brown, about 5-10 more minutes.

The Proper Way to Cut Corned Beef Brisket

There is a right and a wrong way to slice a corn beef brisket. Look closely at the brisket and you should notice the muscle fibers. Slice the brisket parallel to those muscle fibers, or with the grain, and your bites will be dense and chewy. Slice the brisket perpendicular to (across) the muscle fibers, or against the grain, and the bites will the tender. Serve the sliced corned beef with the roasted vegetables and additional graze if desired.

Storage, Freezing and Reheating

Storage: Allow leftover corned beef to cool completely before transferring it to an airtight container. The bourbon glaze can also be store in a smaller separate container. Store in the refrigerator and consume within four days.

Reheating: Bourbon glazed corned beef with the glaze can be reheated for a minute or two in the microwave. You can also place it in a covered dish and reheated in the oven at 350 degrees for 10-15 minutes. The glaze can be reheated in a small saucepan for 5-10 minutes.

Freezing: Place the corned beef in an airtight freezer bag or vacuum sealed bag. Freeze for up to three months.

side view of sliced bourbon glazed corned beef and roasted vegetables on a white platter with a bottle of bourbon and glass in the background

What to Serve with Bourbon Glazed Corned Beef

Corned beef and cabbage … love it or hate it? As a kid, I was definitely on the hate side. A hunk of salty meat boiled for hours, usually served with a side of bland boiled potatoes and cabbage. Gross. As I ventured into adulthood and began learning how to cook, I discovered that even though boiling is the most conventional way to cook corned beef, it’s not the only way.

What is Corned Beef?

Corned beef is made from brisket, a cut of beef taken from the lower chest region of a cow. It has been salt cured, meaning it has been treated with a combination of salt, sugar, and nitrite for the purpose of preservation. In the days before commercial refrigeration, salt curing was a popular way to preserve perishable items. The word corned may refer to the large pieces of saltpeter use to preserve the meat.

While corned beef is typically associated with St. Patrick’s Day and the Irish, it’s not an Irish national dish. During the 17th century, Ireland was a major producer of corned beef. However, most of its citizens could not afford to eat it. Corned beef didn’t rise in popularity among the Irish until they began immigrating to the United States in the 19th century. What was considered a luxury item in their native country was suddenly cheap and readily available in their new home.

Boil the Corned Beef

There are two reasons to boil corned beef brisket during preparation. First, brisket is a tough cut of meat. It requires a longer cooking time in order to tenderize the meat. Second, because corned beef is preserved in salt, obviously it’s going to salty. Boiling helps to remove some of the salt used during preservation.

Most store-bought corned beef has already been cured and is sold with a little packet of pickling spices that may include mustard seed, peppercorns, bay leaves, dill seed and juniper. Place the corned beef in an 8-quart stock pot and cover it with cold water. Add the content of the seasoning packet and bring the water to a boil.

Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover and boil the corned beef for three hours. Be sure to check the water levels periodically and add additional water to the pot if it starts getting to low. This step can be complete a couple days in advance. Just be sure to allow the corned beef to cool completely, then wrap it up in foil or plastic wrap to prevent it from drying out then store it in the refrigerator until you are ready to proceed to the next step.

Before you discard the water from the pot you boiled the corned beef in, reserve two tablespoons. We’re going to use it a little later to make the glaze.

Prepare the Bourbon Glaze

I’m of the opinion that everything tastes better with bourbon.  This bourbon glaze is sweet and really balances out the saltiness of the corned beef.

In a small saucepan, combine 1/2 cup of orange juice, 3/4 cup of packed brown sugar, two of corned beef juice, one teaspoon of whole grain mustard and 1/4 cup of bourbon. Whisk in one tablespoon of cornstarch until the sauce is smooth. Bring the glaze to a boil and cook about 1-2 minutes until the glaze has thickened.

 

Apply the Glaze and Roast

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. I like to roast a few vegetables, such as thinly sliced wedges of cabbage, red potatoes and sliced carrots, in the bottom of the baking pan with the corned beef. Trust me, roasted cabbage is SO MUCH BETTER than boiled. I simply coat the veggies with olive oil, salt and pepper and arrange them in an even layer on the bottom of the baking pan.

Brush the bourbon glaze liberally over the outside of the corned beef. Nestle the corned beef among the vegetables in the enter of the baking pan. Place the pan in the oven and roast for 10 minutes. Apply more glaze, then return it to the oven for an additional 10 minutes.  Repeat this one more time, for a total roasting time of 30 minutes.

The vegetables won’t quite be cooked through by this time, but we don’t want to overcook the brisket. Remove the brisket from the pan and set it on a cutting board to rest. Turn on your broiler, return the vegetables to the oven and continue to roast them until they start to brown, about 5-10 more minutes.

The Proper Way to Cut Corned Beef Brisket

There is a right and a wrong way to slice a corn beef brisket. Look closely at the brisket and you should notice the muscle fibers. Slice the brisket parallel to those muscle fibers, or with the grain, and your bites will be dense and chewy. Slice the brisket perpendicular to (across) the muscle fibers, or against the grain, and the bites will the tender. Serve the sliced corned beef with the roasted vegetables and additional graze if desired.

Storage, Freezing and Reheating

Storage: Allow leftover corned beef to cool completely before transferring it to an airtight container. The bourbon glaze can also be store in a smaller separate container. Store in the refrigerator and consume within four days.

Reheating: Bourbon glazed corned beef with the glaze can be reheated for a minute or two in the microwave. You can also place it in a covered dish and reheated in the oven at 350 degrees for 10-15 minutes. The glaze can be reheated in a small saucepan for 5-10 minutes.

Freezing: Place the corned beef in an airtight freezer bag or vacuum sealed bag. Freeze for up to three months.

What to Serve with Bourbon Glazed Corned Beef

Stir Fried Brussels Sprouts

Mashed Rutabaga with Bacon and Cheddar Cheese

Cheesy Ranch Roasted Potatoes

Corned beef and cabbage … love it or hate it? As a kid, I was definitely on the hate side. A hunk of salty meat boiled for hours, usually served with a side of bland boiled potatoes and cabbage. Gross. As I ventured into adulthood and began learning how to cook, I discovered that even though boiling is the most conventional way to cook corned beef, it’s not the only way.

What is Corned Beef?

Corned beef is made from brisket, a cut of beef taken from the lower chest region of a cow. It has been salt cured, meaning it has been treated with a combination of salt, sugar, and nitrite for the purpose of preservation. In the days before commercial refrigeration, salt curing was a popular way to preserve perishable items. The word corned may refer to the large pieces of saltpeter use to preserve the meat.

While corned beef is typically associated with St. Patrick’s Day and the Irish, it’s not an Irish national dish. During the 17th century, Ireland was a major producer of corned beef. However, most of its citizens could not afford to eat it. Corned beef didn’t rise in popularity among the Irish until they began immigrating to the United States in the 19th century. What was considered a luxury item in their native country was suddenly cheap and readily available in their new home.

Boil the Corned Beef

There are two reasons to boil corned beef brisket during preparation. First, brisket is a tough cut of meat. It requires a longer cooking time in order to tenderize the meat. Second, because corned beef is preserved in salt, obviously it’s going to salty. Boiling helps to remove some of the salt used during preservation.

Most store-bought corned beef has already been cured and is sold with a little packet of pickling spices that may include mustard seed, peppercorns, bay leaves, dill seed and juniper. Place the corned beef in an 8-quart stock pot and cover it with cold water. Add the content of the seasoning packet and bring the water to a boil.

Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover and boil the corned beef for three hours. Be sure to check the water levels periodically and add additional water to the pot if it starts getting to low. This step can be complete a couple days in advance. Just be sure to allow the corned beef to cool completely, then wrap it up in foil or plastic wrap to prevent it from drying out then store it in the refrigerator until you are ready to proceed to the next step.

Before you discard the water from the pot you boiled the corned beef in, reserve two tablespoons. We’re going to use it a little later to make the glaze.

Prepare the Bourbon Glaze

I’m of the opinion that everything tastes better with bourbon.  This bourbon glaze is sweet and really balances out the saltiness of the corned beef.

In a small saucepan, combine 1/2 cup of orange juice, 3/4 cup of packed brown sugar, two of corned beef juice, one teaspoon of whole grain mustard and 1/4 cup of bourbon. Whisk in one tablespoon of cornstarch until the sauce is smooth. Bring the glaze to a boil and cook about 1-2 minutes until the glaze has thickened.

 

Apply the Glaze and Roast

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. I like to roast a few vegetables, such as thinly sliced wedges of cabbage, red potatoes and sliced carrots, in the bottom of the baking pan with the corned beef. Trust me, roasted cabbage is SO MUCH BETTER than boiled. I simply coat the veggies with olive oil, salt and pepper and arrange them in an even layer on the bottom of the baking pan.

Brush the bourbon glaze liberally over the outside of the corned beef. Nestle the corned beef among the vegetables in the enter of the baking pan. Place the pan in the oven and roast for 10 minutes. Apply more glaze, then return it to the oven for an additional 10 minutes.  Repeat this one more time, for a total roasting time of 30 minutes.

The vegetables won’t quite be cooked through by this time, but we don’t want to overcook the brisket. Remove the brisket from the pan and set it on a cutting board to rest. Turn on your broiler, return the vegetables to the oven and continue to roast them until they start to brown, about 5-10 more minutes.

The Proper Way to Cut Corned Beef Brisket

There is a right and a wrong way to slice a corn beef brisket. Look closely at the brisket and you should notice the muscle fibers. Slice the brisket parallel to those muscle fibers, or with the grain, and your bites will be dense and chewy. Slice the brisket perpendicular to (across) the muscle fibers, or against the grain, and the bites will the tender. Serve the sliced corned beef with the roasted vegetables and additional graze if desired.

Storage, Freezing and Reheating

Storage: Allow leftover corned beef to cool completely before transferring it to an airtight container. The bourbon glaze can also be store in a smaller separate container. Store in the refrigerator and consume within four days.

Reheating: Bourbon glazed corned beef with the glaze can be reheated for a minute or two in the microwave. You can also place it in a covered dish and reheated in the oven at 350 degrees for 10-15 minutes. The glaze can be reheated in a small saucepan for 5-10 minutes.

Freezing: Place the corned beef in an airtight freezer bag or vacuum sealed bag. Freeze for up to three months.

What to Serve with Bourbon Glazed Corned Beef

Stir Fried Brussels Sprouts

Mashed Rutabaga with Bacon and Cheddar Cheese

Cheesy Ranch Roasted Potatoes

Corned beef and cabbage … love it or hate it? As a kid, I was definitely on the hate side. A hunk of salty meat boiled for hours, usually served with a side of bland boiled potatoes and cabbage. Gross. As I ventured into adulthood and began learning how to cook, I discovered that even though boiling is the most conventional way to cook corned beef, it’s not the only way.

What is Corned Beef?

Corned beef is made from brisket, a cut of beef taken from the lower chest region of a cow. It has been salt cured, meaning it has been treated with a combination of salt, sugar, and nitrite for the purpose of preservation. In the days before commercial refrigeration, salt curing was a popular way to preserve perishable items. The word corned may refer to the large pieces of saltpeter use to preserve the meat.

While corned beef is typically associated with St. Patrick’s Day and the Irish, it’s not an Irish national dish. During the 17th century, Ireland was a major producer of corned beef. However, most of its citizens could not afford to eat it. Corned beef didn’t rise in popularity among the Irish until they began immigrating to the United States in the 19th century. What was considered a luxury item in their native country was suddenly cheap and readily available in their new home.

Boil the Corned Beef

There are two reasons to boil corned beef brisket during preparation. First, brisket is a tough cut of meat. It requires a longer cooking time in order to tenderize the meat. Second, because corned beef is preserved in salt, obviously it’s going to salty. Boiling helps to remove some of the salt used during preservation.

Most store-bought corned beef has already been cured and is sold with a little packet of pickling spices that may include mustard seed, peppercorns, bay leaves, dill seed and juniper. Place the corned beef in an 8-quart stock pot and cover it with cold water. Add the content of the seasoning packet and bring the water to a boil.

Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover and boil the corned beef for three hours. Be sure to check the water levels periodically and add additional water to the pot if it starts getting to low. This step can be complete a couple days in advance. Just be sure to allow the corned beef to cool completely, then wrap it up in foil or plastic wrap to prevent it from drying out then store it in the refrigerator until you are ready to proceed to the next step.

Before you discard the water from the pot you boiled the corned beef in, reserve two tablespoons. We’re going to use it a little later to make the glaze.

Prepare the Bourbon Glaze

I’m of the opinion that everything tastes better with bourbon.  This bourbon glaze is sweet and really balances out the saltiness of the corned beef.

In a small saucepan, combine 1/2 cup of orange juice, 3/4 cup of packed brown sugar, two of corned beef juice, one teaspoon of whole grain mustard and 1/4 cup of bourbon. Whisk in one tablespoon of cornstarch until the sauce is smooth. Bring the glaze to a boil and cook about 1-2 minutes until the glaze has thickened.

 

Apply the Glaze and Roast

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. I like to roast a few vegetables, such as thinly sliced wedges of cabbage, red potatoes and sliced carrots, in the bottom of the baking pan with the corned beef. Trust me, roasted cabbage is SO MUCH BETTER than boiled. I simply coat the veggies with olive oil, salt and pepper and arrange them in an even layer on the bottom of the baking pan.

Brush the bourbon glaze liberally over the outside of the corned beef. Nestle the corned beef among the vegetables in the enter of the baking pan. Place the pan in the oven and roast for 10 minutes. Apply more glaze, then return it to the oven for an additional 10 minutes.  Repeat this one more time, for a total roasting time of 30 minutes.

The vegetables won’t quite be cooked through by this time, but we don’t want to overcook the brisket. Remove the brisket from the pan and set it on a cutting board to rest. Turn on your broiler, return the vegetables to the oven and continue to roast them until they start to brown, about 5-10 more minutes.

The Proper Way to Cut Corned Beef Brisket

There is a right and a wrong way to slice a corn beef brisket. Look closely at the brisket and you should notice the muscle fibers. Slice the brisket parallel to those muscle fibers, or with the grain, and your bites will be dense and chewy. Slice the brisket perpendicular to (across) the muscle fibers, or against the grain, and the bites will the tender. Serve the sliced corned beef with the roasted vegetables and additional graze if desired.

Storage, Freezing and Reheating

Storage: Allow leftover corned beef to cool completely before transferring it to an airtight container. The bourbon glaze can also be store in a smaller separate container. Store in the refrigerator and consume within four days.

Reheating: Bourbon glazed corned beef with the glaze can be reheated for a minute or two in the microwave. You can also place it in a covered dish and reheated in the oven at 350 degrees for 10-15 minutes. The glaze can be reheated in a small saucepan for 5-10 minutes.

Freezing: Place the corned beef in an airtight freezer bag or vacuum sealed bag. Freeze for up to three months.

What to Serve with Bourbon Glazed Corned Beef

Stir Fried Brussels Sprouts

Mashed Rutabaga with Bacon and Cheddar Cheese

Cheesy Ranch Roasted Potatoes

Corned beef and cabbage … love it or hate it? As a kid, I was definitely on the hate side. A hunk of salty meat boiled for hours, usually served with a side of bland boiled potatoes and cabbage. Gross. As I ventured into adulthood and began learning how to cook, I discovered that even though boiling is the most conventional way to cook corned beef, it’s not the only way.

What is Corned Beef?

Corned beef is made from brisket, a cut of beef taken from the lower chest region of a cow. It has been salt cured, meaning it has been treated with a combination of salt, sugar, and nitrite for the purpose of preservation. In the days before commercial refrigeration, salt curing was a popular way to preserve perishable items. The word corned may refer to the large pieces of saltpeter use to preserve the meat.

While corned beef is typically associated with St. Patrick’s Day and the Irish, it’s not an Irish national dish. During the 17th century, Ireland was a major producer of corned beef. However, most of its citizens could not afford to eat it. Corned beef didn’t rise in popularity among the Irish until they began immigrating to the United States in the 19th century. What was considered a luxury item in their native country was suddenly cheap and readily available in their new home.

Boil the Corned Beef

There are two reasons to boil corned beef brisket during preparation. First, brisket is a tough cut of meat. It requires a longer cooking time in order to tenderize the meat. Second, because corned beef is preserved in salt, obviously it’s going to salty. Boiling helps to remove some of the salt used during preservation.

Most store-bought corned beef has already been cured and is sold with a little packet of pickling spices that may include mustard seed, peppercorns, bay leaves, dill seed and juniper. Place the corned beef in an 8-quart stock pot and cover it with cold water. Add the content of the seasoning packet and bring the water to a boil.

Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover and boil the corned beef for three hours. Be sure to check the water levels periodically and add additional water to the pot if it starts getting to low. This step can be complete a couple days in advance. Just be sure to allow the corned beef to cool completely, then wrap it up in foil or plastic wrap to prevent it from drying out then store it in the refrigerator until you are ready to proceed to the next step.

Before you discard the water from the pot you boiled the corned beef in, reserve two tablespoons. We’re going to use it a little later to make the glaze.

Prepare the Bourbon Glaze

I’m of the opinion that everything tastes better with bourbon.  This bourbon glaze is sweet and really balances out the saltiness of the corned beef.

In a small saucepan, combine 1/2 cup of orange juice, 3/4 cup of packed brown sugar, two of corned beef juice, one teaspoon of whole grain mustard and 1/4 cup of bourbon. Whisk in one tablespoon of cornstarch until the sauce is smooth. Bring the glaze to a boil and cook about 1-2 minutes until the glaze has thickened.

 

Apply the Glaze and Roast

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. I like to roast a few vegetables, such as thinly sliced wedges of cabbage, red potatoes and sliced carrots, in the bottom of the baking pan with the corned beef. Trust me, roasted cabbage is SO MUCH BETTER than boiled. I simply coat the veggies with olive oil, salt and pepper and arrange them in an even layer on the bottom of the baking pan.

Brush the bourbon glaze liberally over the outside of the corned beef. Nestle the corned beef among the vegetables in the enter of the baking pan. Place the pan in the oven and roast for 10 minutes. Apply more glaze, then return it to the oven for an additional 10 minutes.  Repeat this one more time, for a total roasting time of 30 minutes.

The vegetables won’t quite be cooked through by this time, but we don’t want to overcook the brisket. Remove the brisket from the pan and set it on a cutting board to rest. Turn on your broiler, return the vegetables to the oven and continue to roast them until they start to brown, about 5-10 more minutes.

The Proper Way to Cut Corned Beef Brisket

There is a right and a wrong way to slice a corn beef brisket. Look closely at the brisket and you should notice the muscle fibers. Slice the brisket parallel to those muscle fibers, or with the grain, and your bites will be dense and chewy. Slice the brisket perpendicular to (across) the muscle fibers, or against the grain, and the bites will the tender. Serve the sliced corned beef with the roasted vegetables and additional graze if desired.

Storage, Freezing and Reheating

Storage: Allow leftover corned beef to cool completely before transferring it to an airtight container. The bourbon glaze can also be store in a smaller separate container. Store in the refrigerator and consume within four days.

Reheating: Bourbon glazed corned beef with the glaze can be reheated for a minute or two in the microwave. You can also place it in a covered dish and reheated in the oven at 350 degrees for 10-15 minutes. The glaze can be reheated in a small saucepan for 5-10 minutes.

Freezing: Place the corned beef in an airtight freezer bag or vacuum sealed bag. Freeze for up to three months.

What to Serve with Bourbon Glazed Corned Beef

Stir Fried Brussels Sprouts

Mashed Rutabaga with Bacon and Cheddar Cheese

Cheesy Ranch Roasted Potatoes

overhead shot of side view of sliced bourbon glazed corned beef and roasted vegetables on a white platter with a green napkin, tarnished silver meat fork, glass of beer and small dish of glaze to the side
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4.8 from 5 votes

Bourbon Glazed Corned Beef Brisket with Roasted Vegetables

Southern take on a St. Patrick's day classic – glazed corned beef brisket is basted with bourbon, orange juice, whole grain mustard and brown sugar.
Course Entrees, Main Courses
Cuisine American, Irish
Prep Time 3 hours
Cook Time 30 minutes
Resting Time 15 minutes
Total Time 3 hours 30 minutes
Servings 6 people
Calories 484kcal
Author Lisa B.

Ingredients

  • 5 pounds corned beef brisket with seasoning packet
  • 10 small red potatoes washed, quartered
  • 5 carrots peeled, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 cabbage sliced
  • 1-2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Glaze:

  • 1/2 cup orange juice
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons water or corned beef juice
  • 1 teaspoon whole grain mustard
  • 1/4 cup bourbon
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch

Instructions

  • Place brisket in a large stockpot. Cover with water and add seasoning packet.
  • Bring pot to a boil, then simmer for about 3 hours until meat is tender. Reserve 2 tablespoons of the cooking liquid for the glaze. When meat is done, remove from the pot and discard the cooking liquid.
  • In a small saucepan, combine orange juice, brown sugar, corned beef juice, mustard, and bourbon.
  • Whisk in cornstarch until smooth. Bring to a boil and cook until glaze has thickened, about 1-2 minutes.
  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. 
  • Arrange vegetables in a single layer on a roasting pan. Drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. 
  • Place the corned beef in the roasting pan on top of the vegetables. Apply glaze liberally over the top of the entire corned beef.
  • Place corned beef and vegetables in the oven. Glaze the corned beef every 10 minutes for 30 minutes .
  • Remove the corned beef from the oven and set on the counter to rest for 15 minutes.
  • Turn on the broiler and continue to roast the vegetables until they start to brown, about 5-10 minutes.
  • Slice the corned beef against the grain. Serve over roasted vegetables. Drizzle with the glaze.

Notes

Storage: Allow leftover corned beef to cool completely before transferring it to an airtight container. The bourbon glaze can also be store in a smaller separate container. Store in the refrigerator and consume within four days.
Reheating: Bourbon glazed corned beef with the glaze can be reheated for a minute or two in the microwave. You can also place it in a covered dish and reheated in the oven at 350 degrees for 10-15 minutes. The glaze can be reheated in a small saucepan for 5-10 minutes.
Freezing: Place the corned beef in an airtight freezer bag or vacuum sealed bag. Freeze for up to three months.

Nutrition

Serving: 3ounces | Calories: 484kcal | Carbohydrates: 35g | Protein: 22g | Fat: 29g | Saturated Fat: 11g | Cholesterol: 132mg | Sodium: 1708mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 33g

5 Comments

  1. 4 stars
    I liked the recipe and the only thing I changed was the booze.
    I don’t care for bourbon so I used Tulamore Dew Irish whiskey , being Irish American .

  2. This is just a good traditional way to prepare Corned Beef. I have also roasted in the oven and not boiled and in that way you prevent from losing much flavor. The title said a dish from Ireland before clicking on to your site. You would be hard pressed to find Corned Beef in Ireland except for tourist destinations. Corned Beef is an English invention and they eat a lot of it. But I love our traditional American St Patrick’s day version.

  3. The Cooking Bride

    Great! I’m so glad you enjoyed it!

  4. 5 stars
    We enjoyed this recipe on St Patrick’s Day! My husband is making this glaze again for the Easter Ham! Thanks!

  5. 5 stars
    Love the idea of roasting veggies instead–and bourbon belongs on everything!

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